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July 27, 2010 / Richard Smart

Wikileaks’ Japan data on Afghanistan: an index

Below will be a brief description of what is included in each Wikileaks entry on Japan in its Afghan leak. The raw data is available here. All mentions of Japan are in bold on that site (Richard Smart’s blog). Before, a couple of brief warnings:

  • Confirm that we caught all mentions, we may not have.
  • Download the file for yourself.
  • Search the blog text, I may have missed a couple of words that needed to be in bold.

The entries

ENTRY 1

A description of a cache found. Includes a Japanese radio.

ENTRY 2

An IED attack occurs, a Japanese battery is used to power the weapon.

ENTRY 3

Sub-contractors to a Japanese road construction company discover an IED. It is defused with no casualties.

ENTRY 4-6
A Japanese TV crew films in Afghanistan.

ENTRY 7
A description of a village at a meeting. The school there was Japanese built.

ENTRY 8
The Afghan people mention Japan as a major donor.

ENTRY 9
A Japanese NGO discusses health care.

ENTRY 10
The governor of Ghazni mentions a meeting with the Japanese ambassador that took place in Japan.

ENTRY 11
U.S. deputy under-secretary of defense and Afghan foreign secretary discuss the idea of developing military relations similar to Japan-US ones. Afghan minister welcomes idea of a US, Japan, Australia, India fringe meeting at a conference.

ENTRY 12
A bridge in Nangarhar that was built by the Japanese collapses, five rescued, three missing (and probably died).

ENTRY 13
A retaining wall built by a Japanese NGO collapses, leading to agricultural problems in a village.

ENTRY 14
A Japanese watch is used as part of a home-made weapon.

ENTRY 15
Afghanistan requests Japanese assistance to strengthen electricity supply.

ENTRY 16
Key to this entry is that Russia would need time to forgive Afghanistan of its debt.

ENTRY 17
Again, and explosive device contained a Japanese battery.

ENTRY 18
Japanese are constructing a physical therapy center.

ENTRY 19
Japanese have made wells for an area of Afghanistan, but more are still needed.

ENTRY 20
A Japanese-built school lacks certain resources.

ENTRY 21
Japan-made batteries power an explosive.

ENTRY 22
A Japanese NGO refused to bribe an official, and thus ended work on a bridge.

ENTRY 23
Information on how Japan helped to fund some district centers in Afghanistan.

ENTRY 24
A Japanese NGO helps improve rice production in Afghanistan.

ENTRY 25-26
Discussions include a Japanese grassroots project.

ENTRY 27
Confusion about an alleged Japanese project to build a road near Bamiyan.

ENTRY 28
A man named Lt. Corp. Ostlund alleges disinterest in helping an area called Aranus from both Japan and South Korea.

ENTRY 29
Documents a dispute between two villages over the location of a Japanese-built school.

ENTRY 30
Japan and Italy are suggested as potential nations that could help fund a road project.

ENTRY 31
Details Japanese funding for a health facility.

ENTRY 32
A fund request sent to the Japanese.

ENTRY 33
Announcement of a new office for a Japanese organization called JAIC (more than likely a mistake – JICA).

ENTRY 34
Documents the aim of getting Japanese funding for a health clinic.

ENTRY 35
Batteries made in Japan used in an explosive/

ENTRY 36
A description of the Japanese-funded Women’s Poultry Project.

ENTRY 37
Japan battery used in explosive.

ENTRY 38
A hydro-project funded by Japan may be repaired.

ENTRY 39
Assessment of (perhaps entry 38’s) hydro project.

ENTRY 40
Description of a recovered Japanese-made transceiver.

ENTRY 41
Notes on the kidnapping and murder of Japanese aid worker Kazuya Ito.

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