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December 19, 2010 / Richard Smart

U.S. security priorities in Japan – Wikileaks

This cable is one of the most controversial released by Wikileaks and media organizations so far during the Cablegate affair.

Summarizing the contents of the leak, which outlines the U.S. National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP), the State Department says:

The overarching goal of the NIPP is to build a safer, more secure, and more resilient America by enhancing protection of the nation’s CI/KR (critical infrastructure and key resources) to prevent, deter, neutralize or mitigate the effects of deliberate efforts by terrorists to destroy, incapacitate or exploit them; and to strengthen national preparedness, timely response, and rapid recovery in the event of an attack, natural disaster or other emergency.

Here are the locations that the U.S. State Department sees as key in Japan (marked on the above map):

Details Location
C2C Cable Network undersea cable landing Chikura, Japan
C2C Cable Network undersea cable landing Shima, Japan
China-US undersea cable Okinawa, Japan
EAC undersea cable landing Ajigaura, Japan
EAC undersea cable landing Shima, Japan
FLAG/REACH North Asia Loop undersea cable landing Wada, Japan
Japan-US undersea cable landing Maruyama, Japan
Japan-US undersea cable landing Kitaibaraki, Japan
KJCN undersea cable landing Fukuoka, Japan
KJCN undersea cable landing Kita-Kyushu, Japan
Pacific Crossing-1 (PC-1) undersea cable landing Ajigaura, Japan
Pacific Crossing-1 (PC-1) undersea cable landing Shima, Japan
Tyco Transpacific undersea cable landing Toyohashi, Japan
Tyco Transpacific undersea cable landing Emi, Japan
Hitachi, Hydroelectric Dam Turbines and Generators
Port of Chiba Port of Chiba
Port of Kobe Port of Kobe
Port of Nagoya Port of Nagoya
Port of Yokohama Port of Yokohama
Iodine Mine (mostly Chiba?)
Metal Fabrication Machines Titanium null
Metal (Processed) Biken, Kanonji City, Japan Kanonji City, Japan
Hitachi Elec. Power Generators & Components Large AC Generators above 40 MVA null

The data is not so surprising: It explains that the State Department sees Japan’s strategic importance coming through its industry, its ports and the data that travels via undersea cables that pass through the country. One anomaly: There seems to be little of concern to the U.S. State Department in the north of Japan.

A good summary of the global implications of this leak is available here. Wikipedia has also done a good job of sorting out the data on this cable.

Map, table made by Rick Martin. Additional data available here.

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2 Comments

Leave a Comment
  1. dazzlepod / Jan 3 2011 12:10 am

    You can access the WikiLeaks cables in a nice and easy to use site at http://dazzlepod.com/cable/
    The site is updated live and you can get instant notification on new cables by following http://twitter.com/dazzlepod

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  1. What’s important to America, in Japan | Japan Security Watch

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